Pine Trail Cleaners

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Pine Trail Cleaners

Pine Trail Cleaners

1867 North Military Trail
West Palm Beach, FL 33409
Pine Trail Square Shopping Center
across from LA Fitness
(561) 686-8110
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Hours

Monday-Friday: 7am-7pm
Saturday: 8am-3pm

What is Dry CleaningYou go into your local dry cleaning store, drop off your clothes, get your ticket, then drive away. A few days later, you return, pick up your clothes, pay the customer service representative, and drive away again.

But, do you know what happened to your clothes while they were at the dry cleaning shop? Do you know what dry cleaning is and how it works?

A Brief History

Dry Cleaning dates back to ancient times, probably beginning with the advent of textile clothing itself. The ruins of Pompeii gives a record of a highly developed trade of “fullers” who were professional clothes cleaners. Lye and ammonia were used in early laundering, and a type of clay known as “fuller’s earth” was used to absorb soils and grease from clothing too delicate for laundering.

There are many stories about the origin of dry cleaning, all centering on a surprise discovery when a petroleum-type fluid was accidentally spilled on a greasy fabric. It quickly evaporated and the stains were miraculously removed. The firm of Jolly-Belin, opening in Paris in the 1840s, is credited as the first dry cleaning firm.

Solvents

In spite of the name, dry cleaning is not completely dry. Fluids are used in the dry cleaning process. In the early days, garment scourers and dryers found several fluids that could be used as dry cleaning solvents, including camphene, benzene, kerosene, and gasoline. These fluids are all dangerously flammable, so dry cleaning was a hazardous business until safer solvents were developed.

In the 1930s, percholoroethylene or perc (a nonflammable, synthetic solvent) was introduced and is used today in many dry cleaning plants. Other cleaning solvents have been added, these include most predominantly hydrocarbon, Green Earth and others are currently being introduced and tested.

Dry Cleaning is not the answer to all soil and stain removal problems. Sometimes, stains become permanently embedded in the fiber, or fabrics cannot withstand normal cleaning and stain removal procedures, or decorative trim is not compatible with dry cleaning solvent. It is important that consumers as well as drycleaners read all care labels and follow the instructions.

Before cleaning, garments are inspected and classified. The length of the cleaning cycle is dependent upon the type of article cleaned and the degree of soiling.

Some heavily stained garments may go through a stain removal process prior to cleaning to aid in better soil and stain removal. A stain removal technician will treat specific items just prior to cleaning. A lot of effort goes into the process, and there are many skilled technicians involved in caring for your garments.

Now, when you visit your drycleaner, you will have a better understanding of this “magical process” of dry cleaning.